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Use #5 for a stick: Catch a crawdad

Crawdad catching season is in full swing around here. It’s such a popular past time with my kids I thought I’d share a few tips for other small aspiring ‘fishermen’.

What you need:

  • String
  • Stick
  • Paperclip or binder clip
  • Bait: Salami, peperonii, bacon, bologna or your choice of bad fatty meat

The set-up:

  • Tie your sting to the end of a stick
  • Tie a clip to the end of the string or tie the bait directly to the stirng

The Technique:

  • Find a  place that has crawdads. Lake, stream, river, canal etc. (ideally the water will be clear enough to see the bottom)
  • Locate a place near rocks or along the edge of the water.
  • Dangle the bait in the water, allowing it to sink to the bottom near the edge of the rocks or bank
  • Wait for crawdads find the bait
  • When the crawdads pinch the bait and try to tear a piece off, pull the bait out of the water at a steady moderate speed and dangle the crawdad over a bucket (when the crawdad realizes it is hanging in the air it will let go and fall in the bucket)

We have tried bringing some crawdads home as pets with limited success.

Have any of you used any other methods to catch crawdads, leave your story about the ‘one that got away’

Happy hunting

4 Comments so far

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  1. Somehow I never knew about crawdads until recently….not sure how I missed that…. The verdict is still out about what I feel about them, but I bet they are great fun to catch! Do you eat them?

    • Amelia – Apparently Tiffany (alittlecampy.com) eats them! I did try eating them once as a kids and remembered liking them… might have to try them again?

  2. You can also catch crawfish in ditches which are holding water and other places which have shallow water. Attach your bait to the inside of a net (with a large safety pin). Place the net in the water careful to keep the handle out of the water where you can pick it back up. Leave it for about 5-10 minutes. Come back and lift up your net.

    We haven’t tried to keep them for a pet. I grew up in Louisiana and we boil them with spices and serve with potatoes and corn. :)

    • Tiffany – Thanks for the netting tip, we’ll have to try that out this summer. My brother and I actually tried cooking some up when we were kids, I remember liking them. I’d sorta forgotten about that.

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    I'm Lindsey. I'm an environmental educator, my husband's a biologist. The outdoors is infused into everything we do; which explains why I'm better at mud pies than home decorating. More About Me

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